Wild flowers, Day 17 – 30 Days Wild

Wild flowers aren’t my normal area of photography or interest but at the moment they can’t be ignored. So I’ve been out and taken photos of some flowers for Day 17 of 30 Days Wild.

Part of the field near my house has been planted up as a wild flower meadow and looks amazing at the moment. As I walk around the edge of it every flower seems to hold an insect. The deers and badgers are creeping around amongst the flowers and I expect there are lots of mice, voles and shrews running around that I can’t see, which the local kestrel can.

This year we have left our front garden to grow rather than mowing it and out of nowhere at least 10 species of flowers have appeared.

 

About Alex White - Appletonwild

This is my diary of the wildlife where I live in Oxfordshire, and sometimes the places I visit. My passion is for British wildlife, especially Badgers and Hares. I am a keen amateur photographer using a Canon SX60 HS. All the photographs on this blog are taken by myself unless stated otherwise. I am a member of A Focus on Nature, the network for Young Nature Conservationists, BBOWT, The Oxon Mammal group and The Oxfordshire badger Group. You can also follow me on Twitter @Appletonwild
This entry was posted in 30 Days Wild, garden, nature, outdoors, Oxfordshire, Rural life, Uncategorized, Wildflowers and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Wild flowers, Day 17 – 30 Days Wild

  1. Hi Alex, your blog is fantastic! I love it when people ‘Don’t mow Let it Grow’. Look forward to reading more. Dara

    Liked by 1 person

  2. New Moons For Old says:

    I wonder whether the owners of the field will cut it for hay later in the summer, and whether they will then have livestock to graze the aftermath. It will be interesting to see how the field develops, as different plant species take precedence over time.
    I noticed that the scarlet pimpernel flowers were closed – it must have been a wet day. This plant used to be called ‘poor man’s weather glass’, because its flowers respond to wet or dry weather by closing or opening, so that the country people who could not afford a barometer could use it to give them some idea of what the day’s weather might bring.
    You say that you don’t take flower photos often, but these are great.

    Liked by 1 person

    • appletonwild says:

      Thank you for the information on the Scarlet pimpernel. I’m not sure why I don’t take many photos of plants. You have given me an idea about doing a blog about plant folklore. Thank you

      Like

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