Garden Wildlife – Part 11 Wildflowers

The garden today is starting to come alive with wildflowers. In the grass, the flower borders, the gravel and between the cracks in the patio. I was quite surprised by just how many I found in the space of a few minutes

Many may call these weeds but they are an important source of food for insects.

Cowslip - Primula veris

Cowslip

Hairy bitter-cress

Hairy Bitter Cress

Lords and ladies

Lords and ladies

Dandelion

Dandelion

Germander Speedwell

Germander Speedwell

Red dead nettle

Red dead nettle

Common Groundsel - Senecio vulgaris

Groundsel

Common nettle

Common nettle

Common Daisy

Common Daisy

Lesser celandine

Lesser celandine

I have no id for these two, so I would be happy if anyone could help – Thank you

Now have a name for one, thanks to Eliza – ivy-leaved speedwell

 

 

About Alex White - Appletonwild

This is my diary of the wildlife where I live in Oxfordshire, and sometimes the places I visit. My passion is for British wildlife, especially Badgers and Hares. This year my debut book "Get Your Boots On" was published I am a keen amateur photographer. All the photographs on this blog are taken by myself unless stated otherwise. I am a member of A Focus on Nature, the network for Young Nature Conservationists, BBOWT, The Oxon Mammal group and The Oxfordshire Badger Group. You can also follow me on Twitter @Appletonwild Instagram appletonwild
This entry was posted in Environment, garden, Get Your Boots On, insects, Local patch, nature, outdoors, Oxfordshire, Uncategorized, Wildflowers and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to Garden Wildlife – Part 11 Wildflowers

  1. Linda Losito says:

    Just catching up with your blogs. Unknown white flower likely to be Common Whitlow Grass. Leafless stalk. Flower cluster at top. Petals cleft to base. Height 3 to 6 in. Form variable. Bare ground. Flowers Mar to May. Erophila verna.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Neil Anderson says:

    Agree with IDs above. Also the general appearance of your bittercress looks more like Wavy Bittercress- check number of stamens for confirmation.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Alexis says:

    Nice! the first of the “unknowns” looks like a Common Whitlowherb (Draba verna), but it’s hard to say without leaves. Also Germander speedwells have a distinct border between the blue and white all the way around, yours looks like a Bird’s-eye Speedwell.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Eliza Waters says:

    Not sure of the first one, but I believe the second photo is Veronica hederifolia, the ivy-leaved speedwell.

    Liked by 1 person

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