Badger Bones

A couple of weeks ago I found the remains of a dead badger. Not much, a few hairs and a pile of bones.

With the close proximity of the badger to my local sett I’m guessing that this badger belonged to my local clan. I don’t think it was anything suspicious but I’m interested to find out which badger is missing.

Over the summer I don’t see the badgers as regularly as I do in the Spring, so there are a few I haven’t seen for a while.

I’ve had the trail camera out and spotted Arrow, Pirate, Stick and a few others, including one of this years cubs but not Bog or the twins.

Skull A belongs to the badger I found, whereas Skull B is one I found over a year ago. I did a blog on skull B last year   https://appletonwildlifediary.wordpress.com/2018/03/31/badger-skull/

I put a call out on social media and I had some helpful replies, including photos, statistics and diagrams of skull, teeth and pelvic bone measurements which will hopefully help me gauge the sex and age of the badger. I’ve already had a suggestion that it could be a subadult female, which I think means it could be one of last years cubs, rather than any of the adults that I have got to know well over the past few years.

I’m going to spend sometime over the weekend looking closely at the bones as well as more trail camera footage to see if I can get any closer to finding out who is missing.

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About Alex White - Appletonwild

This is my diary of the wildlife where I live in Oxfordshire, and sometimes the places I visit. My passion is for British wildlife, especially Badgers and Hares. I am a keen amateur photographer using a Canon SX60 HS. All the photographs on this blog are taken by myself unless stated otherwise. I am a member of A Focus on Nature, the network for Young Nature Conservationists, BBOWT, The Oxon Mammal group and The Oxfordshire badger Group. You can also follow me on Twitter @Appletonwild Instagram appletonwild
Image | This entry was posted in Animals, Badgers, Blogging, Environment, Local patch, mammals, nature, Uncategorized, Wildlife and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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